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We understand that saying goodbye to your beloved family member is one of the most difficult decisions you’ll ever have to make as a pet owner. Please see below for some of the most common questions that we are asked about hospice and euthanasia.

Euthanasia Questions

What can I expect during an at-home euthanasia appointment?

An At-Home Euthanasia appointment usually lasts about 1-1.5 hours. Dr. Carissa knows that this is a difficult time and there is no rush. First, the owner will sign paperwork consenting to the euthanasia procedure and payment is collected. Dr. Carissa will introduce herself to your pet and put together a group of medications to help calm and sedate them. This medication will take 10-15 minutes to become effective. Once your pet is fully relaxed or even sleeping, Dr. Carissa will inject a medication that painlessly stops the heart from beating. Afterward, Dr. Carissa will listen for a heartbeat and confirm your pet has passed away. Throughout the procedure, Dr. Carissa will check in with you and guide you through the process.

Do I have to be present for the euthanasia?

Dr. Carissa needs the legal owner to be present to sign the consent form, and the legal owner must be over 18 years of age. After the paperwork is signed, you are not required to stay. Some owners choose to stay until their pet falls asleep with the first injection; some choose to stay for the entire procedure. It’s up to each person to decide what they’re most comfortable with. Dr. Carissa will accommodate whatever you need during this difficult time.

What happens to my pet’s remains after euthanasia?

This is a personal question that ultimately, you decide. Here are the options:

  • At-Home Burial: The first option is to bury your pet at home, but many cities restrict this option. There is no additional charge. Please check with your local county and city laws before selecting this option.

 

  • Communal Cremation: Dr. Carissa will take your pet’s body with her, and your pet will be cremated with other pets with no ashes returned to you. The fee for this service is $105 for pets up to 75 pounds and $155 for pets 76+ pounds.

 

  • Separate Cremation*: Your pet will be cremated with other pets in one machine. They are spaced apart from each other so each pet’s ashes can be separately gathered and returned to you. The fee for this service is $175 for pets up to 75 pounds and $225 for pets 76+ pounds.

 

*This is the option Dr. Carissa usually chooses for her own pets.

 

Individual Cremation: Your pet will be cremated in an individual compartment within the machine. This is the best option to assure no other pet’s cremains are may be mixed in.The fee for this service is $205 for pets up to 75 pounds and $255 for pets 76+ pounds.

 

What are my payment options?

Healing Hands Mobile Veterinarian accepts either cash or credit card (Visa, Mastercard or AmEx). Please indicate at the time you schedule your appointment if you will be using cash. Payment is collected prior to performing the euthanasia.

What is the difference between Hospice and Palliative care?

Hospice care is provided to pets that have a life-limiting illness, such as cancer. Palliative care is provided to pets that have a chronic illness that is not life-limiting, such as severe arthritis.

When Dr. Carissa will not perform euthanasia:
  •       Dr. Carissa will not euthanize a healthy, adoptable pet.
  •       Dr. Carissa will not euthanize an animal with a treatable condition, such as ringworm, allergies, dental disease etc.
  •       Dr. Carissa will not perform a convenience euthanasia. Convenience euthanasia is when an owner would rather euthanize a pet instead of giving it up for adoption.
  •       Dr. Carissa will not euthanize a cat for urinating outside of the litter box. This is a complex issue with medical and behavioral components. As Dr. Carissa usually only meets you and your pet for the euthanasia itself, it’s hard to know if these cases meet Dr. Carissa’s ethical standard of not euthanizing healthy, adoptable pets or pets with a treatable condition.

 

Aggressive pet euthanasia

If you would like to discuss euthanizing an aggressive animal, you need to be able to support that the animal is aggressive and detail the steps you have taken to try and mitigate the behavior. The techniques used for euthanasia may vary from the procedure listed elsewhere as maintaining safety is paramount. Rest assured, if Dr. Carissa agrees to help you in this difficult circumstance, you and your pet will still receive the same compassionate care Dr. Carissa is known for.

 

Dr. Carissa charges an addition $100 for this service.

 

 

Hospice and Palliative Care Questions

What is the difference between Hospice and Palliative care?

Hospice care is provided to pet’s that have a life limiting illness, such as cancer.  Palliative care is provided to pets that have a chronic illness that is not life limiting, such as severe arthritis.